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Bioinformation. 2019 Mar 15;15(3):194-200. doi: 10.6026/97320630015194. eCollection 2019.

Impact of rotavirus and hepatitis A virus by worldwide climatic changes during the period between 2000 and 2013.

Author information

1
Team of Virology and Oncology, Laboratory of Virology, Microbiology, Quality and Biotechnology/Ecotoxicology and Biodiversity, Faculty of Sciences and Techniques Mohammedia, University Hassan II of Casablanca.
2
Team of Biotechnology an Environment Laboratory of Virology, Microbiology, Quality and Biotechnology/ Eco toxicology and Biodiversity, Faculty of Sciences and techniques Mohammedia,University Hassan II of Casablanca.
3
Team of Eco toxicology and Biodiversity, Laboratory of Virology, Microbiology, Quality and Biotechnology/Ecotoxicology and Biodiversity, Faculty of Sciences and techniques Mohammedia, University Hassan II of Casablanca.
4
Team of Immuno parasitology, Laboratory food, Environment and Health FST Gueliz, University Cadi Ayyad Marrakech.

Abstract

Enteric viruses are present in the environment as a result of the discharge of poorly or untreated wastewater. The spread of enteric viruses in the environment depend to human activities like stools of infected individuals ejected in the external environment can be transmitted by water sources and back to susceptible individuals for other cycles of illness. Among the enteric viruses Rotaviruses (RV) and Hepatitis A viruses (HAV) is the most detected in wastewater causing gastroenteritis and acute hepatitis. Therefore, it is of interest to climate change, mainly temperature and carbon Dioxide (CO2) variations, on Rotavirus and Hepatitis A as a model of enteric viruses present in the aquatic environment using computational modelling tools. The results of genetic ratio showed a negative correlation between the epidemiological data and the mutation rate. However, the correlation was positive between the temperature, CO2 increase, and the rate of mutation. The positive correlation is explained by the adaptation of the viruses to the climatic changes, the RNA polymerase of the RV induces errors to adapt to the environmental conditions. The simultaneous increase in number of infections and temperature in 2010 has been demonstrated in previous studies deducing that viral pathogenicity increase with temperature increase.

KEYWORDS:

Carbon dioxide; hepatitis A virus; mutation rate; rotavirus; temperature variations

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