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Arch Osteoporos. 2019 Jul 27;14(1):82. doi: 10.1007/s11657-019-0632-z.

The effects of short-term back extensor strength training in postmenopausal osteoporotic women with vertebral fractures: comparison of supervised and home exercise program.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Bafra State Hospital, Samsun, Turkey.
2
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Pamukkale University, Kınıklı, 20070, Denizli, Turkey.
3
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Pamukkale University, Kınıklı, 20070, Denizli, Turkey. alkangsc@yahoo.com.
4
Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Pamukkale University, Denizli, Turkey.

Abstract

This study explores the effect of supervised back extensor strength training on spinal pain, back extensor muscle strength, trunk-arm endurance, kyphosis, functional mobility, and quality of life (QoL) among sixty postmenopausal women with vertebral osteoporotic fractures.

PURPOSE:

To compare the effects of a 6-week supervised or home-based program of back-strengthening exercise on spinal pain, back extensor strength, trunk-arm endurance, kyphosis, functional mobility, and QoL in osteoporotic postmenopausal women with vertebral fractures.

METHODS:

The study was designed as a randomized controlled clinical trial. Sixty osteoporotic postmenopausal women with vertebral fracture (mean age 60.3 ± 9.3 years) were included in the study. Subjects were randomly assigned into three groups (supervised program, home-based program, or control), each consisting of 20 subjects. The subjects underwent the 6-week exercise program which included strengthening exercise for the back extensor muscles. They performed three sets of 8, 10, or 12 repetitions for each of the exercises, biweekly ascending, three times per week. Spinal pain, back extensor strength, trunk and arm endurance, kyphosis, functional mobility, and QoL were measured at baseline and at the end of the exercise program.

RESULTS:

Statistically significant improvements were demonstrated on spinal pain, muscle strength and endurance, functional mobility, and QoL for the supervised exercise program compared with control and home-based exercise groups (p < 0.01). Home-based exercise program did not provide a significant improvement compared with the control group except for mobility parameters of QoL.

CONCLUSIONS:

Six-week supervised back extensor strengthening training is superior to home-based program in terms of spinal pain, back extensor muscle strength, trunk endurance, functional mobility, and QoL for postmenopausal osteoporotic women with vertebral fractures.

KEYWORDS:

Exercise; Osteoporosis; Rehabilitation; Vertebral fractures

PMID:
31352573
DOI:
10.1007/s11657-019-0632-z

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