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J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2019 Jul 25. pii: S1701-2163(19)30271-3. doi: 10.1016/j.jogc.2019.03.002. [Epub ahead of print]

Maternal Mental Health in Assisted and Natural Conception: A Prospective Cohort Study.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Sinai Health System, Toronto, ON; Faculty of Health Sciences, Queens University, Kingston, ON.
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Sinai Health System, Toronto, ON.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Sinai Health System, Toronto, ON.
4
Mount Sinai Fertility, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Sinai Health System, Toronto, ON; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON.
5
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Sinai Health System, Toronto, ON; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON.
6
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Sinai Health System, Toronto, ON; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON. Electronic address: alan.bocking@sinaihealthsystem.ca.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study sought to compare the pregnancy and postpartum self-reported mood and mental health status of women who conceived with assisted reproductive technology (ART) with those of women who conceived spontaneously.

METHODS:

In this prospective cohort study, 1176 pregnant women from prenatal clinics in the Ontario Birth Study were enrolled. In the pregnancy and the postpartum period, women who conceived with ART, including in vitro fertilization and intrauterine insemination, were compared with women who conceived spontaneously regarding depression and anxiety at 12-16 weeks and 24-28 weeks gestation and 6-10 weeks postpartum. The following main outcome measures were used: Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, two-item Patient Health Questionnaire, State Trait Anxiety Inventory six-item scale, and two-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (Canadian Task Force Classification II-2).

RESULTS:

Women who conceived with ART demonstrated a decreased likelihood of depression compared with women who spontaneously conceived (SC) at 24-28 weeks gestation (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale: ART 3.6% vs. SC 15%; P < 0.01; two-item Patient Health Questionnaire: ART 0.0% vs. SC 4.0%; P = 0.027), as well as decreased perceived stress (mean score: ART 3.25 vs. SC 4.02; P < 0.01). Women in the ART group also had a lower percentage of positive two-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder scores (ART 2.7% vs SC 7.5%; P = 0.049). There was no difference in self-reported depression, anxiety, or perceived stress between groups at 12-16 weeks gestation or at 6-10 weeks postpartum.

CONCLUSION:

Women who conceived using ART reported decreased rates of depressive symptoms, perceived stress, and generalized anxiety during the second trimester of pregnancy compared with women who had SC pregnancies, and both groups experienced similar mental health status earlier in gestation and in the postpartum period.

KEYWORDS:

Anxiety; assisted reproductive technologies; conception; depression; mental health; pregnancy

PMID:
31351834
DOI:
10.1016/j.jogc.2019.03.002

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