Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am. 2019 Sep;31(3):285-302. doi: 10.1016/j.cnc.2019.05.001. Epub 2019 Jun 24.

Lung Transplant for the Critical Care Nurse.

Author information

1
Lung Center Service Line, Temple University Hospital, 6th floor Rock Pavilion, 3401 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA. Electronic address: kevin.carney@tuhs.temple.edu.
2
Lung Center Service Line, Temple University Hospital, 6th floor Rock Pavilion, 3401 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA.
3
Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Temple University Hospital, 2nd floor Rock Pavilion, 3401 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA.

Abstract

Lung transplantation is an established treatment of select patients with end-stage pulmonary disease. Lung transplantation should be considered for patients with end-stage pulmonary disease who have an expected 2-year survival of less than 50% without lung transplant and an expected 5-year survival of greater than 80% after transplant. This article reviews routine postsurgical intensive care unit management, along with management of complications such as acute kidney injury, atrial arrhythmias, deep vein thrombosis, primary graft dysfunction, hyperammonemia syndrome, and thrombocytopenia. Finally, management of long-term issues, including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and bronchial stenosis, is discussed.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiothoracic surgery; ECMO; Immunosuppression; Lung transplant; Respiratory failure

PMID:
31351551
DOI:
10.1016/j.cnc.2019.05.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center