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J Behav Med. 2019 Jul 26. doi: 10.1007/s10865-019-00082-9. [Epub ahead of print]

The Association Between Family Social Network Size and Healthy Lifestyle Factors: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).

Author information

1
Department of Psychological, Health, and Learning Sciences, University of Houston, 3657 Cullen Boulevard, Room 491, Houston, TX, 77204-5029, USA. rmurillo3@uh.edu.
2
Institute for Minority Health Research, University of Illinois-Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.
3
Department of Psychology, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA.
4
Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
5
Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, NY, USA.
6
Department of Medical Social Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
7
Department of Social Medicine, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
8
Department of Psychology, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA.
9
Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.

Abstract

We examined associations of central family (i.e., children, parents, in-laws) social network size with healthy lifestyle factors (i.e., favorable body mass index, physical activity, diet, alcohol use, smoking). Using data on 15,511 Hispanics/Latinos 18-74 years old from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, multivariable adjusted survey logistic regression was used to compute associations of social network size with healthy lifestyle factors. A one-unit higher total of central family size was associated with lower odds of healthy body mass index (OR 0.90; 95% CI 0.86-0.93) and having all five healthy lifestyle factors (OR 0.90; 95% CI 0.85-0.96). Findings suggest familial structural social support may contribute to healthy lifestyle factors and differ based on the type of relationship among Hispanics/Latinos.

KEYWORDS:

Health behavior; Healthy lifestyle; Hispanic; Latino; Social support

PMID:
31350713
DOI:
10.1007/s10865-019-00082-9

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