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Int Rev Neurobiol. 2019;146:229-257. doi: 10.1016/bs.irn.2019.06.012. Epub 2019 Jun 28.

Therapeutic potential of cannabinoids as neuroprotective agents for damaged cells conducing to movement disorders.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine and Nursing, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Leioa, Spain; Neurodegenerative Diseases Group, BioCruces Bizkaia Health Research Institute, Barakaldo, Bizkaia, Spain.
2
Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain.
3
Department of Neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine and Nursing, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Leioa, Spain.
4
Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine and Nursing, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Leioa, Spain; Neurodegenerative Diseases Group, BioCruces Bizkaia Health Research Institute, Barakaldo, Bizkaia, Spain; Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain.
5
Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine and Nursing, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Leioa, Spain; Neurodegenerative Diseases Group, BioCruces Bizkaia Health Research Institute, Barakaldo, Bizkaia, Spain. Electronic address: teresa.morera@ehu.eus.

Abstract

The basal ganglia (BG), an organized network of nuclei that integrates cortical information, play a crucial role in controlling motor function. In fact, movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD) are caused by the degeneration of specific structures within the BG. There is substantial evidence supporting the idea that cannabinoids may constitute novel promising compounds for the treatment of movement disorders as neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory agents. This potential therapeutic role of cannabinoids is based, among other qualities, on their capacity to reduce oxidative injury and excitotoxicity, control calcium influx and limit the toxicity of reactive microglia. The mechanisms involved in these effects are related to CB1 and CB2 receptor activation, although some of the effects are CB receptor independent. Thus, taking into account the aforementioned properties, compounds that act on the endocannabinoid system could be useful as a basis for developing disease-modifying therapies for PD and HD.

KEYWORDS:

CB1 receptor; CB2 receptor; Endocannabinoids; Neuroinflammation; Neuroprotection

PMID:
31349929
DOI:
10.1016/bs.irn.2019.06.012

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