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Early Child Res Q. 2019 2nd Quarter;47:331-340. doi: 10.1016/j.ecresq.2019.01.007. Epub 2019 Feb 10.

Effects of socioeconomic status and executive function on school readiness across levels of household chaos.

Author information

1
Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Boston University.
2
Center for Alcohol & Addiction Studies, Brown University.
3
Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Brown University.
4
Department of Psychology, The George Washington University.

Abstract

Isolating child attributes and familial characteristics that support school readiness in children on the upper half of the socioeconomic spectrum can complement existing research on lower-socioeconomic status (SES) children and facilitate a more complete understanding of how children's performance varies across the full SES spectrum. This study examined if relations between SES, two components of executive function (EF; set-shifting and inhibitory control), and school readiness vary as a function of household chaos in 564 four-year-old children, primarily from middle-to upper-middle class families in the Northeast Region of the United States. Structural equation modeling of direct and indirect effects revealed three major findings: 1) higher levels of EF were related to better school readiness regardless of level of household chaos; 2) SES had an indirect effect on school readiness through set-shifting; and 3) household chaos was negatively associated with school readiness.

KEYWORDS:

early experience; executive function; household chaos; preschool; school readiness; socioeconomic status

PMID:
31341348
PMCID:
PMC6656382
[Available on 2020-02-10]
DOI:
10.1016/j.ecresq.2019.01.007

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