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Sci Rep. 2019 Jul 24;9(1):10720. doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-47293-3.

Temporal distribution and biological determinants of thrombotic events after interventions for dialysis vascular access.

Author information

1
Cardiovascular Centre, National Taiwan University Hospital, Hsinchu Branch, Hsinchu, Taiwan.
2
College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.
3
Division of Cardiovascular surgery, Department of Surgery, National Taiwan University Hospital, Hsinchu Branch, Hsinchu, Taiwan.
4
Department of Nursing, National Taiwan University Hospital, Hsinchu Branch, Hsinchu, Taiwan.
5
Division of Preventive Medicine and Health Services Research, Institute of Population Health Sciences, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli, Taiwan.
6
Cardiovascular Centre, National Taiwan University Hospital, Hsinchu Branch, Hsinchu, Taiwan. chihchengwumd@gmail.com.
7
College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan. chihchengwumd@gmail.com.
8
Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan. chihchengwumd@gmail.com.

Abstract

Endovascular therapy is the principal therapy for haemodialysis vascular access dysfunction. Nonetheless, the incidence and determinants of post-intervention thrombotic events are unclear. This prospective cohort study evaluated the incidence and timing of thrombotic events after endovascular therapy and analysed the clinical, angiographic, and biological determinants of thrombosis. Of the 236 patients enrolled, 91 experienced post-intervention thrombotic events within 1 year. The 1-year thrombosis-free patency was 28% for thrombosed accesses, 53% for non-thrombosed grafts, and 78% for non-thrombosed fistulas. Forty-one of the 91 thrombotic events (45%) occurred within 3 months post-intervention. In the univariate analysis, early thrombosis was associated with longer haemodialysis duration (hazard ratio [HR], 1.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.02), graft access (HR, 7.69; 95% CI, 3.33-20.0), multiple stenoses (HR, 2.69; 95% CI, 1.36-5.37), and high indoxyl sulphate (IS) levels (HR, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.32-1.82). Late thrombosis was associated with diabetes (HR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.01-3.57), cardiovascular disease (HR, 2.38; 95% CI, 1.27-4.54), and endothelial progenitor cell counts (HR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.93-0.99). After multivariate adjustment, high IS was the major predisposing factor for early post-intervention thrombosis (HR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.18-1.69). Our findings suggest that measures to decrease IS could target the most critical period of thrombosis.

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