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Nutrients. 2019 Jul 23;11(7). pii: E1689. doi: 10.3390/nu11071689.

Nutrient Content of Squeeze Pouch Foods for Infants and Toddlers Sold in the United States in 2015.

Author information

1
Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, USA. uzy2@cdc.gov.
2
U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, Rockville, MD 20852, USA. uzy2@cdc.gov.
3
Epidemic Intelligence Service, Center for Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, USA. uzy2@cdc.gov.
4
Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, USA.
5
Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0117, USA.
6
Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, USA.
7
U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, Rockville, MD 20852, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

To describe the availability and nutrient composition of U.S. commercially available squeeze pouch infant and toddler foods in 2015.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Data were from information presented on nutrition labels for 703 ready-to-serve, pureed food products from 24 major U.S. infant and toddler food brands. We described nutritional components (e.g., calories, fat) and compared them between packaging types (squeeze pouch versus other packaging types) within food categories.

RESULTS:

397 (56%) of the analyzed food products were packaged as squeeze pouches. Differences in 13 nutritional components between squeeze pouch versus other packaging types were generally small and varied by food category. Squeeze pouches in the fruits and vegetables, fruit-based, and vegetable-based categories were more likely to contain added sugars than other package types.

CONCLUSION:

In 2015, squeeze pouches were prevalent in the U.S. commercial infant and toddler food market. Nutrient composition differed between squeeze pouches and other packaging types for some macro- and micronutrients. Although it is recommended that infants and toddlers under two years old not consume any added sugars, a specific area of concern may be the inclusion of sources of added sugar in squeeze pouches. Linking this information with children's dietary intake would facilitate understanding how these differences affect overall diet quality.

KEYWORDS:

complementary feeding; infant; nutrition; toddler

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