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Cancer Immunol Res. 2019 Sep;7(9):1412-1425. doi: 10.1158/2326-6066.CIR-19-0258. Epub 2019 Jul 23.

Engineered Adoptive T-cell Therapy Prolongs Survival in a Preclinical Model of Advanced-Stage Ovarian Cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Immunology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington.
2
Clinical Research Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington.
3
Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington.
4
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington.
5
Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington.
6
Department of Immunology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. pgreen@uw.edu.

Abstract

Adoptive T-cell therapy using high-affinity T-cell receptors (TCR) to target tumor antigens has potential for improving outcomes in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) patients. Ovarian tumors develop a hostile, multicomponent tumor microenvironment containing suppressive cells, inhibitory ligands, and soluble factors that facilitate evasion of antitumor immune responses. Developing and validating an immunocompetent mouse model of metastatic ovarian cancer that shares antigenic and immunosuppressive qualities of human disease would facilitate establishing effective T-cell therapies. We used deep transcriptome profiling and IHC analysis of human HGSOC tumors and disseminated mouse ID8VEGF tumors to compare immunologic features. We then evaluated the ability of CD8 T cells engineered to express a high-affinity TCR specific for mesothelin, an ovarian cancer antigen, to infiltrate advanced ID8VEGF murine ovarian tumors and control tumor growth. Human CD8 T cells engineered to target mesothelin were also evaluated for ability to kill HLA-A2+ HGSOC lines. IHC and gene-expression profiling revealed striking similarities between tumors of both species, including processing/presentation of a leading candidate target antigen, suppressive immune cell infiltration, and expression of molecules that inhibit T-cell function. Engineered T cells targeting mesothelin infiltrated mouse tumors but became progressively dysfunctional and failed to persist. Treatment with repeated doses of T cells maintained functional activity, significantly prolonging survival of mice harboring late-stage disease at treatment onset. Human CD8 T cells engineered to target mesothelin were tumoricidal for three HGSOC lines. Treatment with engineered T cells may have clinical applicability in patients with advanced-stage HGSOC.

PMID:
31337659
PMCID:
PMC6726582
[Available on 2020-03-01]
DOI:
10.1158/2326-6066.CIR-19-0258

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