Format

Send to

Choose Destination
SSM Popul Health. 2019 Jun 28;8:100441. doi: 10.1016/j.ssmph.2019.100441. eCollection 2019 Aug.

A population-level study of the mental health of siblings of children who have a developmental disability.

Author information

1
School of Public Health and Social Policy, University of Victoria, PO BOX 1700 STN CSC, Victoria, BC, V8W 2Y2, Canada.
2
School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, 201-2206 East Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3, Canada.

Abstract

This study used population level administrative data for health service utilization from the Ministry of Health, British Columbia, Canada to assess the mental health of siblings of children who have a developmental disability. At a population level, the study found strong evidence that siblings of children who have a developmental disability experience higher odds of a depression or other mental health diagnosis compared to siblings of children who do not have a developmental disability. In addition, there was evidence that in families with a child with a developmental disability, siblings who are diagnosed with depression or another mental health problem use physician and/or hospital services for these conditions to a greater extent than siblings who are diagnosed with depression or a mental health problem but do not have a family member with a developmental disability. Evidence of increased depression and mental health problems existed across all income levels, indicating that other stressors may have an impact. These findings suggest that siblings of children who have a developmental disability are a vulnerable group in need of programs and services that support their mental health.

KEYWORDS:

Children; Depression; Developmental disability; Mental health; Siblings

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center