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Saudi J Anaesth. 2019 Jul-Sep;13(3):191-196. doi: 10.4103/sja.SJA_792_18.

Preference of cognitive approaches for decision making among anesthesiologists' in Saudi Arabia.

Author information

1
College of Medicine, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
2
Anaesthesia Department, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

Abstract

Aims:

The aim of this study was to analyze the thinking processes of anesthesia physicians at in Riyadh, Jeddah, and Dammam cities in Saudi Arabia.

Subjects and Methods:

This cross-sectional study was undertaken in the cities of Riyadh, Jeddah, and Dammam in Saudi Arabia. Using a previously published psychometric tool (the Rational and Experiential Inventory, REI-40), the survey was sent through email and social networks to anesthesia physicians working in the targeted hospitals. An initial survey was sent out, followed by a reminder and a second survey to nonrespondents. Analysis included descriptive statistics and Student's t-tests.

Results:

Most of the participants (69.2%) were males. At the time of the study, 35% of participants were consultants; 9.6% were associate consultants; 19.2% were registrars, fellows, or staff physicians; and 35.8% were senior residents. Anesthesia physicians' mean "rational" score was 3.22 [standard deviation (SD) =0.49)] and their mean "experiential" score was 3.01 (SD = 0.31). According to Pearson's correlation, the difference of 0.21 between these two scores was not statistically significant (P = 0.35). Male anesthesia physicians tended more toward faster, logical thinking. Consultant anesthesia physicians had faster rational thinking than nonconsultant physicians (P = 0.01). Anesthesia physicians with more than 10 years in practice had faster rational thinking than physicians who had worked for fewer than 10 years (P = 0.001).

Conclusions:

This study evaluated anesthesia physicians' general decision-making approaches. Despite the fact that both rational and experiential techniques are used in clinical decision-making, male consultants and physicians with more than 10 years' experience and certified non-Saudi board anesthesiologists prefer rational decision-making style.

KEYWORDS:

Anesthesia; decision-making; experiential; rational

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