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Per Med. 2019 Jul;16(4):337-350. doi: 10.2217/pme-2018-0155. Epub 2019 Jul 23.

The clinical application of gene editing: ethical and social issues.

Author information

1
Department of Genetics & Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
2
Institute of Health Policy, Management & Evaluation, University of Toronto; Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada.
3
Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada.
4
Social & Behavioral Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
5
Penn Center for Inherited Cardiac Disease, Penn Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.
6
Centre for Research Ethics & Bioethics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
7
Society & Ethics Research, Connecting Science, Wellcome Genome Campus, Cambridge, UK.
8
Dr J T Macdonald Foundation Department of Human Genetics, Institute of Bioethics & Health Policy, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, USA.
9
Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, PA 19104, USA.
10
Biomedical Ethics Research Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.
11
Department of Bioethics, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA.
12
Biomedical Ethics Research Program & Center for Individualized Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.

Abstract

Gene-editing techniques have progressed rapidly in the past 5 years. There are already ongoing human somatic gene-editing clinical trials for multiple diseases. And there has been one purported scenario of human germline gene editing in late 2018. In this paper, we will review the current state of the technology, discuss the ethical and social issues that surround the various forms of gene editing, as well as review emerging stakeholder data from professionals, the 'general public' and individuals and families dealing with genetic diseases potentially treatable by gene editing.

KEYWORDS:

CRISPR; clinical trials; ethics; gene editing; genome editing; germline gene editing; professional attitudes; public attitudes; somatic gene editing; stakeholder research

PMID:
31331245
DOI:
10.2217/pme-2018-0155

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