Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Surg Res. 2019 Dec;244:502-508. doi: 10.1016/j.jss.2019.06.008. Epub 2019 Jul 19.

The Pediatric Surgeon-Scientist: Succeeding in Today's Academic Environment.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.
2
Division of Pediatric Surgery, Laboratory for Regenerative Tissue Repair, Texas Children's Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.
3
Division of Pediatric Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
4
Division of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
5
Division of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center, Memphis, Tennessee.
6
Division of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.
7
Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas; Division of Pediatric Surgery, Laboratory for Regenerative Tissue Repair, Texas Children's Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas; Division of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Surgery, Texas Children's Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. Electronic address: keswani@bcm.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Pediatric surgeons have long been advocates of basic science research. However, new challenges facing the scientific community have threatened the success of academic surgeons pursuing basic science careers. The purpose of this study was to compare academic pediatric surgeons' perceptions of their ability to effectively conduct basic science research to those of other surgical subspecialties.

METHODS:

An online survey was distributed to all members of the Association for Academic Surgery and Society of University Surgeons. A total of 1033 members (41%) responded, and 137 (13.3%) were pediatric surgeons. Comparisons were made between the five most-represented surgical subspecialties. Data are presented as reporting percentage and P values by Student's t-test.

RESULTS:

Among the specialists studied, pediatric surgeons are those most likely to believe that surgeons can succeed as basic scientists in today's research environment. Pediatric surgery reported the highest rates of National Institutes of Health funding of all surgical specialties and the lowest rates of perceived external pressures related to clinical demands, hospital administrative duties, and work-life balance concerns than their surgical peers.

CONCLUSIONS:

Pediatric surgeons have a more optimistic perspective on the state of basic science research in surgery while exhibiting an enhanced ability to overcome the challenges that surgeon-scientists currently face. Our findings suggest that pediatric surgery may provide a model for succeeding in basic science in today's challenging surgical research environment.

KEYWORDS:

Academic surgery; Basic science research; Pediatric surgery; Surgical faculty

PMID:
31330294
DOI:
10.1016/j.jss.2019.06.008

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center