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Drug Discov Ther. 2019;13(3):137-144. doi: 10.5582/ddt.2019.01029.

Status of use of protease inhibitors for the prevention and treatment of pancreatitis after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: An epidemiologic analysis of the evidence-practice gap using a health insurance claims database.

Author information

1
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Japanese Red Cross Society Wakayama Medical Center.
2
Department of Health Informatics, Kyoto University School of Public Health.

Abstract

Existing evidence suggests that protease inhibitors (PIs) used to prevent or treat pancreatitis after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) are ineffective, and their use is not recommended by clinical practice guidelines. However, in Japan, PIs are administered with the aim to prevent or treat post-ERCP pancreatitis. This study aimed to clarify the gap between guideline recommendations and contents of practice. We used the health insurance claims database of Japan Medical Data Center. Among patients who had undergone ERCP, those with acute pancreatitis or post-ERCP pancreatitis recorded in claims as disease names were defined as post-ERCP pancreatitis patients. The study period was divided into three terms according to the date of publication of clinical practice guidelines for acute pancreatitis. Among 2,945 patients who had undergone ERCP, 2,847 were eligible for analysis. Of these, 1,375 (48.3%) patients had claims with pancreatitis recorded as the disease name; PIs were prescribed to 1,238 (90.0%). Rates of prescription of PIs were 72.3% in 2005-07, 70.9% in 2008-09, and 83.6% in 2010-15, showing a significant increase (p < 0.001). In conclusion, PIs are administered in clinical practice in Japan for the purpose of preventing or treating pancreatitis, with an increasing trend in prescription in recent years.

KEYWORDS:

Protease inhibitor; endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP); evidence-practice gap; health insurance claims database; pancreatitis

PMID:
31327789
DOI:
10.5582/ddt.2019.01029
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