Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Asian J Psychiatr. 2019 Aug;44:58-60. doi: 10.1016/j.ajp.2019.07.030. Epub 2019 Jul 15.

'Too little dose - too early discontinuation?'-Effect of buprenorphine dose on short term treatment adherence in opioid dependence.

Author information

1
Centre for Addiction Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore, India. Electronic address: doctorpartheeban@gmail.com.
2
Centre for Addiction Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore, 560011, India. Electronic address: drlekhansh@gmail.com.
3
Department of Psychopharmacology and Toxicology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore, 560011, India. Electronic address: ps842010@gmail.com.
4
Centre for Addiction Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore, 560011, India. Electronic address: arunnimhans05@gmail.com.
5
Centre for Addiction Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore, 560011, India. Electronic address: prabhatkumarchand@gmail.com.
6
Centre for Addiction Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore, 560011, India. Electronic address: pratimamurthy@gmail.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Opioid substitution therapy is an evidence-based treatment for opioid dependence syndrome. Retention in treatment is a crucial mediator of treatment success. Our study aims to examine factors associated with early treatment non-compliance among patients who are initiated on office-based Buprenorphine Maintenance Treatment (BMT).

METHOD:

This is a prospective observational study conducted among 89 subjects who were initiated on BMT and were followed up to 6 weeks. At baseline, we evaluated subjects using: Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview Plus, Addiction Severity Index-Lite, Multi-Dimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, Heroin Craving Questionnaire, and urine toxicological analysis. Treatment adherence for six weeks was noted.

RESULTS:

Among Eighty-nine subjects, 57 per cent of the sample reported addiction to pharmaceutical opioids. The mean dose of Buprenorphine was 6.7 mg (SD = 4.1). During follow up 67 per cent (n = 62) patients were adherent to treatment while 33 per cent (n = 27) non-adherent to treatment. The mean dose of buprenorphine in the non-adherent group was significantly lower than the adherent group (4.3 mg and 7.7 mg, respectively, t [87] = 3.8, p < 0.001). A comparison of groups based on the dose of Buprenorphine (6 mg or higher vs lower than 6 mg) revealed that odds of treatment non-adherence were three times higher in patients receiving 6 mg or lesser dose (Odds Ratio = 3.15 [95% CI = 2.0-8.6],χ2 [1] = 4.75, p = 0.035).

CONCLUSION:

Dose of Buprenorphine prescribed by the treating clinician influences early treatment compliance significantly.

KEYWORDS:

Addiction; Buprenorphine; Compliance; Opioid dependence; Opioid substitution therapy

PMID:
31325758
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajp.2019.07.030

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center