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Curr Opin Plant Biol. 2019 Jul 16;52:23-29. doi: 10.1016/j.pbi.2019.05.010. [Epub ahead of print]

Polarized transport across root epithelia.

Author information

1
Department of Botany and Plant Biology, University of Geneva, 30 Quai Ernest Ansermet, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland.
2
Department of Botany and Plant Biology, University of Geneva, 30 Quai Ernest Ansermet, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland. Electronic address: marie.barberon@unige.ch.

Abstract

Plant roots explore the soil to acquire water and nutrients which are often available at concentrations that drastically differ from the plant's actual need for growth and development. This stark difference between availability and requirement can be dealt with owing to the root's architecture as an inverted gut. In roots, the two epithelial characteristics (selective acquisition and diffusion barrier) are split between two cell layers: the epidermis at the root periphery and the endodermis as the innermost cortical cell layer around the vasculature. Polarized transport of nutrients across the root epithelium can be achieved through different pathways: apoplastic, symplastic, or coupled transcellular. This review highlights different features of the root that allow this polarized transport. Special emphasis is placed on the coupled transcellular pathway, facilitated by polarized nutrient carriers along root cell layers but barred by suberin lamellae in endodermal cells.

PMID:
31323542
DOI:
10.1016/j.pbi.2019.05.010

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