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Prev Med. 2019 Sep;126:105772. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2019.105772. Epub 2019 Jul 16.

Association of cardiovascular health through early adulthood and health-related quality of life in middle age: The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA. Electronic address: lindsay.pool@northwestern.edu.
2
Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
3
Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA.

Abstract

Previous studies have linked cardiovascular health (CVH) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL), but only in cross-sectional analyses where temporality cannot be established. The aim of this study was to determine trajectories of CVH from early adulthood to middle age, and examine their association with HRQoL in middle age. This analysis, conducted in 2018, included 3275 participants of the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study who completed a year 30 follow-up exam in 2015/2016. Group-based trajectory modeling was used to create CVH trajectories, according to American Heart Association definitions, from baseline through follow-up year 20. HRQoL was assessed by the Medical Outcomes Study 12-Item Short Form Health Survey at year 30, which included the physical component summary score (PCS), the mental component summary score (MCS), and overall self-rated health (SRH). The mean (SD) age of the sample was 55.1 (3.6) years, 1868 (57%) were women, and 1541 (47%) were black. Five CVH trajectories were identified, 31% of CARDIA participants maintained ideal CVH during follow-up. Maintaining ideal CVH was associated with higher PCS and MCS, and lower odds of fair/poor SRH as compared to the other trajectory groups. Compared to the consistently low CVH group, those who maintained ideal CVH had on average a 5.9 point higher PCS (95% CI, 4.2-7.7), a 2.5-point higher MCS (95% CI, 0.5-4.4), and 84% lower odds of fair/poor SRH (95% CI, 0.09, 0.31). Our findings suggest that maintaining ideal CVH from early adulthood results in higher health-related quality of life in middle age.

KEYWORDS:

Ideal cardiovascular health; Quality of life; Self-rated health

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