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Cell Death Dis. 2019 Jul 18;10(8):548. doi: 10.1038/s41419-019-1792-x.

The Cornelia de Lange Syndrome-associated factor NIPBL interacts with BRD4 ET domain for transcription control of a common set of genes.

Author information

1
Andalusian Center for Molecular Biology and Regenerative Medicine-CABIMER, CSIC-Universidad de Sevilla-Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Av. Américo Vespucio 24, 41092, Seville, Spain.
2
Dipartimento di Scienze della Salute, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via A. di Rudinì 8, 20142, Milano, Italy.
3
Dipartimento di Bioscienze, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Giovanni Celoria 26, 20133, Milano, Italy.
4
Andalusian Center for Molecular Biology and Regenerative Medicine-CABIMER, CSIC-Universidad de Sevilla-Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Av. Américo Vespucio 24, 41092, Seville, Spain. mario.garcia@cabimer.es.

Abstract

Mutations in NIPBL are the major cause of Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS). NIPBL is the cohesin-loading factor and has recently been associated with the BET (bromodomains and extra-terminal (ET) domain) proteins BRD2 and BRD4. Related to this, a CdLS-like phenotype has been described associated to BRD4 mutations. Here, we show direct interaction of NIPBL with different BET members in yeast, and selective interaction with BRD4 in cells, being the ET domain involved in the interaction. To understand the relationship between NIPBL and BET proteins, we have performed RNA-Seq expression analysis following depletion of the different proteins. Results indicate that genes regulated by NIPBL largely overlap with those regulated by BRD4 but not with those regulated by BRD2. ChIP-Seq analysis indicates preferential NIPBL occupancy at promoters, and knockdown experiments show mutual stabilization of NIPBL and BRD4 on co-regulated promoters. Moreover, human fibroblasts from CdLS probands with mutations in NIPBL show reduced BRD4 at co-occupied promoters. Functional analysis in vivo, using mutants of Drosophila melanogaster, confirmed the genetic interaction between Nipped-B and fs(1)h, the orthologs of human NIPBL and BRD4, respectively. Thus, we provide evidence for NIPBL and BRD4 cooperation in transcriptional regulation, which should contribute to explain the recently observed CdLS-like phenotype associated with BRD4 mutations.

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