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J Assoc Physicians India. 2018 Oct;66(10):22-26.

Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes is Higher among Men with Persistent Impaired Glucose Tolerance than in Transient Impaired Glucose Tolerance - A 5 year Follow up Study.

Author information

1
India Diabetes Research Foundation and Dr. A. Ramachandran's Diabetes Hospitals, Chennai, Tamil Nadu.
2
Hubert Department of Global Health, Emory Global Diabetes Research Center, Atlanta, USA.
3
Visakha Steel General Hospital, Visakhapatnam, Andha Pradesh.
4
Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College, London, UK.
5
India Diabetes Research Foundation and Dr. A. Ramachandran's Diabetes Hospitals, Chennai, Tamil Nadu;Corresponding Author.

Abstract

Objective:

This was a 5 year comparative analysis of the incidence of type 2 diabetes in men who had persistent impaired glucose tolerance (P-IGT) versus transient impaired glucose tolerance (T-IGT). P-IGT (positive IGT on two oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT), T-IGT (IGT in first OGTT and normal glucose tolerance (NGT) in the 2nd OGTT).

Methods:

The samples were collected from a randomized controlled diabetes prevention study. The prevention study was done using lifestyle modification (LSM) promoted by use of mobile short message services (SMS) for 2 years. The control group of the randomized study who received advice on LSM at only the baseline formed the P-IGT group for the 3 years follow up study (n=236). T-IGT (n=569) were available from those who had NGT on the 2nd OGTT while screening for the prevention study. The total diabetes incidence at 5 years in the study groups were compared using standard OGTT (WHO criteria).

Results:

The conversion rate to diabetes in 5 years was significantly lower among T-IGT than among P-IGT, OR=0.202 (95% CI, 0.145-0.296,p< 0.0001). P-IGT had higher rate of risk factors for diabetes than T-IGT.

Conclusion:

The risk of conversion to diabetes was 80 percent lower in T-IGT than in P-IGT. Identification of P-IGT will help in selecting persons who require early intervention for diabetes.

PMID:
31317702
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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