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Diabet Med. 2019 Jul 17. doi: 10.1111/dme.14082. [Epub ahead of print]

There is value in treating elevated levels of diabetes distress: the clinical impact of targeted interventions in adults with Type 1 diabetes.

Author information

1
Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
2
Behavioural Diabetes Institute, Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA.
3
Oregon Research Institute, Eugene, OR, USA.
4
Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.

Abstract

AIM:

To compare the effect of targeted interventions to reduce high diabetes distress among adults with Type 1 diabetes with a comparison sample of similar but untreated individuals, and to document the stability of untreated diabetes distress over time.

METHODS:

A total of 51 adults with Type 1 diabetes with elevated baseline diabetes distress (distress score ≥ 2.0) and HbA1c levels (≥ 58 mmol/mol) were identified from a longitudinal, non-intervention study, and compared with a similar sample of 51 participants in an intervention study. Both groups completed the T1-DDS diabetes distress questionnaire at baseline and 9 months.

RESULTS:

Large and significant reductions in diabetes distress scores were recorded in the intervention group (mean ± sd change = -0.6 ± 0.6), while minimal change was found in the non-intervention group (-0.2 ± 0.6, group effect P = 0.002; effect size d = 0.67). Additional analyses using the established minimal clinically important difference for the T1-DDS showed that diabetes distress increased significantly (minimal clinically important difference ≥ 1) or persisted at high levels for 51% of participants in the non-intervention group, compared with 23.5% in the intervention group.

CONCLUSION:

Our results showed that targeted interventions led to dramatic reductions in diabetes distress compared with a lack of treatment. We also conclude that elevated diabetes distress, when left unaddressed, does not resolve over time and often remains chronic. (Clinical Trials Registry no.: NCT02175732).

PMID:
31314907
DOI:
10.1111/dme.14082

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