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J Asthma. 2019 Jul 16:1-10. doi: 10.1080/02770903.2019.1633542. [Epub ahead of print]

The impact of a question prompt list and video intervention on teen asthma control and quality-of-life one year later: results of a randomized trial.

Author information

1
a Division of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy , UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Chapel Hill , NC , USA.
2
b Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research , University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Chapel Hill , NC , USA.
3
c Alexor, Inc. , Morrisville , NC , USA.
4
d Division of General Internal Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology, School of Medicine , University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Chapel Hill , NC , USA.
5
e Southern New Hampshire University , Manchester , NH , USA.
6
f Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, School of Medicine , University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Chapel Hill , NC , USA.

Abstract

Objective: This study examined whether youth who received an asthma question prompt list/video intervention were more likely to have their asthma controlled and better quality-of-life at 12 months than youth who received usual care. Methods: English or Spanish-speaking youth ages 11-17 were enrolled and randomized to intervention or usual care. The 185 youth and parents in the intervention group watched the video on an iPad and then received a one-page asthma question prompt list to complete before their visits. One hundred seventy-four received usual care. Baseline and 6-month visits were audio-tape recorded. Generalized Estimating Equations were used to predict a youth's quality-of-life and whether asthma was controlled at 12 months. Results: Asthma control and quality-of-life improved significantly from baseline to 12-month follow-up in both intervention and usual care groups. Baseline asthma control and quality-of-life were significantly associated with 12-month asthma control and quality-of-life, respectively. Adolescents on a control medication at baseline were significantly more likely to have their asthma controlled at 12 months. Conclusions: Asthma control and quality-of-life did not improve significantly more in the intervention group than in the usual care group.

KEYWORDS:

adolescents; asthma management self-efficacy; asthma quality-of-life; educational video; empowerment; question asking; respiratory

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