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Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2019 Oct;66(10):e27920. doi: 10.1002/pbc.27920. Epub 2019 Jul 16.

Mentors' perspectives on the successes and challenges of mentoring in the COG Young Investigator mentorship program: A report from the Children's Oncology Group.

Author information

1
Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital, Vanderbilt Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology and Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee.
2
Texas Children's Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.
3
Children's Hospital at Dartmouth, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire.
4
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio.
5
Childrens's Healthcare of Atlanta, Aflac Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, Atlanta, Georgia.
6
The Hospital for Sick Children, The University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
7
Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplant, Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
8
Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Alfred L. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, Delaware.
9
Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio.
10
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio.
11
Department of Pathology, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio.
12
Department of Biomedical Education & Anatomy, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio.
13
Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital, St. Petersburg, Florida.
14
Children's National Health System, George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, District of Columbia.
15
Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, The Children's Hospital at Sinai, Baltimore, Maryland.
16
Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, Baltimore, Maryland.
17
Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Children's Hospital of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Identification and development of young investigators (YI) is critical to the long-term success of research organizations. In 2004, the Children's Oncology Group (COG) created a mentorship program to foster the career development of YIs (faculty <10 years from initial appointment). This study sought to assess mentors' long-term assessment of this program.

PROCEDURE:

In 2018, 101 past or current mentors in the COG YI mentorship program completed an online survey. Statistical comparisons were made with the Kruskal-Walis test.

RESULTS:

The response rate was 74.2%. As some mentors had multiple mentees, we report on 138 total mentee-mentor pairs. Mentors were 57.4% male, and mentees were 39.1% male. Mentors rated being mentored as a YI as important with a median rating of 90 on a scale of 1-100, interquartile range (IQR) 80-100. Most mentors reported that being mentored themselves helped their own success within COG (78.2%) and with their overall career development (92.1%). Most mentors enjoyed serving in the program (72.3%) and the median success rating (on a scale of 1-100) across the mentor-mentee pairings was 75, IQR 39-90. Success ratings did not differ by mentor/mentee gender, but improved with increased frequency of mentor-mentee interactions (P < .001). Mentor-mentee pairs who set initial goals reported higher success ratings than those who did not (P < .001). Tangible successes included current mentee COG committee involvement (45.7%), ongoing mentor-mentee collaboration (53.6%), and co-authored manuscript publication (38.4%).

CONCLUSION:

These data indicate that mentorship is important for successful professional development. Long-term mentoring success improves when mentors and mentees set goals upfront and meet frequently.

KEYWORDS:

Children's Oncology Group; career development; mentorship; pediatric oncology

PMID:
31309744
PMCID:
PMC6707882
[Available on 2020-10-01]
DOI:
10.1002/pbc.27920

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