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J Anaesthesiol Clin Pharmacol. 2019 Apr-Jun;35(2):254-260. doi: 10.4103/joacp.JOACP_350_17.

Incidence and predictors of postoperative pulmonary complications in patients undergoing craniotomy and excision of posterior fossa tumor.

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1
Department of Neuroanaesthesiology and Critical Care, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.

Abstract

Background and Aims:

Infratentorial neurosurgical procedures are considered high risk for the development of postoperative pulmonary complications (POPCs), prolonging hospital stay of patients with substantial morbidity and mortality.

Material and Methods:

Patients between the ages of 18 and 65 years, who underwent elective surgery for posterior fossa tumors over a period of two years, were reviewed. Data including American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status; comorbidities like hypertension, diabetes mellitus and hypothyroidism, history of smoking, obstructive sleep apnea, respiratory symptoms, lower cranial nerve (LCN) palsy; intraoperative complications such as hemodynamic alterations suggestive of brain stem or cranial nerve handling, tight brain as informed by the operating neurosurgeon, blood loss, and transfusion; and postoperative duration of mechanical ventilation, tracheostomy, POPCs, length of ICU and hospital stay, general condition of the patient at discharge, and cause of in-hospital mortality were collected. POPC was defined as the presence of atelectasis, tracheobronchitis, pneumonia, bronchospasm, respiratory failure, reintubation, or weaning failure.

Results:

Case files of 288 patients fulfilling the study criteria were analyzed; POPCs were observed in 35 patients (12.1%). On multivariate analysis, postoperative blood transfusion, LCN palsy, prolonged ICU stay, and tracheostomy were found to be independent predictors of POPC.

Conclusions:

The incidence of POPC was 12.1% following infratentorial tumor surgery. The predictors for the occurrence of POPCs were postoperative blood transfusion, LCN palsy, prolonged ICU stay, and tracheostomy.

KEYWORDS:

Neurosurgery; posterior fossa tumor; postoperative pulmonary complications

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