Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sleep Health. 2019 Jul 10. pii: S2352-7218(19)30102-0. doi: 10.1016/j.sleh.2019.05.005. [Epub ahead of print]

Association of sleep characteristics with cardiovascular health among women and differences by race/ethnicity and menopausal status: findings from the American Heart Association Go Red for Women Strategically Focused Research Network.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, 51 Audubon Avenue, 5(th) Floor, New York, USA, 10032.
2
Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Institute of Human Nutrition, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, USA.
3
Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
4
Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, 51 Audubon Avenue, 5(th) Floor, New York, USA, 10032. Electronic address: baf2108@cumc.columbia.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:

Sleep is an emerging risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that is not currently included as a cardiovascular health (CVH) metric in the American Heart Association's Life's Simple 7 (AHA LS7). Our objective was to evaluate the association of sleep with CVH in women and examine differences by menopausal status and race/ethnicity.

METHODS:

Baseline data from the Columbia University AHA Go Red for Women Strategically Focused Research Network were examined. Sleep habits were self-reported using validated questionnaires. A CVH score was computed using AHA LS7 criteria for smoking, diet, physical activity, BMI, blood pressure(BP), total cholesterol, and fasting glucose. Women received a score of 2 (ideal), 1 (intermediate), or 0 (poor) based on their level of meeting each AHA LS7 metric. Multivariable-adjusted regression models were used to evaluate associations of sleep with meeting overall and individual CVH metrics.

RESULTS:

The analytical sample consisted of n = 507 women (62% minority/Hispanic, mean age:37 y). Participants with adequate sleep duration (≥7 h), good sleep quality, no insomnia nor snoring, and low risk for OSA were more likely to meet >4 of the AHA LS7 metrics (P < .01). Poorer sleep quality (β = -0.08, P = .002), higher insomnia severity (β = -0.05, P = .002), snoring (β = -0.77, P = .0001), and higher risk for OSA (β = -1.63, P < .0001) were associated with poorer CVH. Insomnia, snoring, and high OSA risk were associated with 69% to >300% higher odds of having poor CVH (P ≤ .03). Associations were stronger in post-menopausal and racial/ethnic minority women.

CONCLUSIONS:

Better sleep habits were associated with more favorable CVH among women, suggesting that there may be benefit in incorporating sleep assessment into CVD risk screening.

KEYWORDS:

AHA Life's Simple 7; Cardiovascular health; Menopausal status; Race/ethnicity; Sleep

PMID:
31302068
DOI:
10.1016/j.sleh.2019.05.005

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center