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Pathophysiology. 2019 Jun 28. pii: S0928-4680(19)30033-1. doi: 10.1016/j.pathophys.2019.06.004. [Epub ahead of print]

Dynamic gut microbiome changes following regional intestinal lymphatic obstruction in primates.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Shreveport, Shreveport, LA, USA; Department for General-Visceral and Transplant Surgery, University of Münster, Münster, Germany.
2
Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Shreveport, Shreveport, LA, USA.
3
University of Louisiana at Lafayette, New Iberia Research Center, New Iberia, LA, USA.
4
Louisiana State University School of Medicine, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Shreveport, LA, USA.
5
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Shreveport, Shreveport, LA, USA.
6
Research Core Facility, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Shreveport, Shreveport, LA, USA.
7
Feist-Weiller Cancer Center, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Shreveport, Shreveport, LA, USA.
8
Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine and Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Texas, TX, USA.
9
Department of Pediatrics, Section of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center - Shreveport, Shreveport, LA, USA.
10
Department of Computer Sciences, Louisiana State University-Shreveport, Shreveport, LA, USA.
11
Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Shreveport, Shreveport, LA, USA; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Shreveport, Shreveport, LA, USA. Electronic address: jalexa@lsuhsc.edu.

Abstract

The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been linked with lymphostasis, but whether and how lymphatic obstruction might disturb the intestinal microbiome in the setting of Crohn's Disease (CD) is currently unknown. We employed a new model of CD in African Green monkeys, termed 'ATLAS' (African green monkey truncation of lymphatics with obstruction and sclerosis), to evaluate how gut lymphatic obstruction alters the intestinal microbiome at 7, 21 and 61 days. Remarkable changes in several microbial sub- groupings within the gut microbiome were observed at 7 days post-ATLAS compared to controls including increased abundance of Prevotellaceae and Bacteroidetes-Prevotella-Porphyromonas (BPP), which may contribute to disease activity in this model of gut injury. To the best of our knowledge, these findings represent the first report linking lymphatic structural/gut functional changes with alterations in the gut microbiome as they may relate to the pathophysiology of CD.

KEYWORDS:

Crohn’s disease; Inflammatory bowel disease; Lymphatic obstruction; Lymphatics; Microbiome; Non-human primate

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