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Nutrition. 2019 Oct;66:153-165. doi: 10.1016/j.nut.2019.04.007. Epub 2019 Apr 26.

Does diet play a role in reducing nociception related to inflammation and chronic pain?

Author information

1
Council for Nutritional and Environmental Medicine (CONEM), Mo i Rana, Norway. Electronic address: Bjorklund@conem.org.
2
Research Department, Innlandet Hospital Trust, Brumunddal, Norway; Faculty of Health and Social Science, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Elverum, Norway.
3
Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Ovidius University, Constanta, Romania.
4
Semey Medical University, Semey, Kazakhstan; CONEM Kazakhstan Environmental Health and Safety Research Group, Semey Medical University, Semey, Kazakhstan.
5
Razi Vaccine and Serum Research Institute, Agricultural Research, Education and Extension Organization (AREEO), Karaj, Iran.
6
Diabetes Clinic, Department of Internal Medicine, UZ Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels, Belgium; Department of Nutrition, UZ Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels, Belgium.
7
Department of Neurosciences, Biomedicine and Movement Sciences, University of Verona, Verona, Italy; CONEM Scientific Secretary, Verona, Italy.

Abstract

Dietary habits are fundamental issues to assess when modulating health and well-being; however, different nutritional panels may help individuals prevent acute and chronic pain. Many substances, known to be active antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds, should serve this fundamental task. Antinociceptive and analgesic natural compounds include flavonoids, terumbone from ginger root, curcuminoids, ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and taurine. Furthermore, correct intake of trace elements and minerals is strategic to reduce inflammation-related pain. This review addresses these items in an effort to suggest new criteria for proper dietary supplementation to prevent pain.

KEYWORDS:

Diet; Natural compounds; Nutritional supplementation; Pain

PMID:
31301604
DOI:
10.1016/j.nut.2019.04.007

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