Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Clin Nutr. 2019 Sep 1;110(3):759-768. doi: 10.1093/ajcn/nqz136.

Improving fruit and vegetable intake attenuates the genetic association with long-term weight gain.

Wang T1,2, Heianza Y1, Sun D1, Zheng Y3, Huang T4, Ma W5, Rimm EB5,6,7, Manson JE5,7,8, Hu FB6,7, Willett WC5,6,7, Qi L1,6,7.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, USA.
2
Shanghai National Clinical Research Center for Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Key Laboratory for Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases of the National Health Commision of the PR China, Shanghai Institute of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Rui Jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.
3
State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering School of Life Sciences, Department of Cardiology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
4
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University, Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences, Ministry of Education, Beijing, China.
5
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
6
Department of Nutrition, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
7
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
8
Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Whether changes in fruit and vegetable intake can modify the effect of genetic susceptibility to obesity on long-term changes in BMI and body weight are uncertain.

OBJECTIVE:

We analyzed the interactions of changes in total and specific fruit and vegetable intake with genetic susceptibility to obesity in relation to changes in BMI and body weight.

METHODS:

We calculated a genetic risk score on the basis of 77 BMI-associated loci to determine the genetic susceptibility to obesity, and examined the interactions of changes in total and specific fruit and vegetable intake with the genetic risk score on changes in BMI and body weight within five 4-y intervals over 20 y of follow-up in 8943 women from the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and 5308 men from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (HPFS).

RESULTS:

In the combined cohorts, repeated 4-y BMI change per 10-risk allele increment was 0.09 kg/m2 among participants with the greatest decrease in total fruit and vegetable intake and -0.02 among those with the greatest increase in intake (P-interaction <0.001; corresponding weight change: 0.20 kg compared with -0.06 kg). The magnitude of decrease in BMI associated with increasing fruit and vegetable intake was more prominent among participants with high genetic risk than those with low risk. Reproducible interactions were observed for fruits and vegetables separately (both P-interaction <0.001). Based on similar nutritional content, the interaction effect was greatest for berries, citrus fruits, and green leafy vegetables, and the interaction pattern persisted regardless of the different fiber content or glycemic load of fruits and vegetables.

CONCLUSIONS:

Genetically associated increased BMI and body weight could be mitigated by increasing fruit and vegetable intake, and the beneficial effect of improving fruit and vegetable intake on weight management was more pronounced in individuals with greater genetic susceptibility to obesity.

KEYWORDS:

fruits; genetic susceptibility; gene–diet interaction; vegetables; weight gain

PMID:
31301130
PMCID:
PMC6736184
[Available on 2020-09-01]
DOI:
10.1093/ajcn/nqz136

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center