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J Antimicrob Chemother. 2019 Jul 11. pii: dkz253. doi: 10.1093/jac/dkz253. [Epub ahead of print]

Successful treatment with daptomycin and ceftaroline of MDR Staphylococcus aureus native valve endocarditis: a case report.

Author information

1
Infectious Diseases Service, University Hospital and University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland.
2
Infectious Diseases Service, Hospital Clinic-IDIBAPS, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
3
Institute of Microbiology, University Hospital and University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland.
4
Transplantation Center, University Hospital and University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The best therapeutic approach for treating MRSA endocarditis remains unknown, particularly in cases of high vancomycin MICs. We report here a case of daptomycin-non-susceptible, ceftaroline-resistant and fosfomycin-resistant MRSA native left valve endocarditis that was successfully treated with valve repair and a combination of high-dose daptomycin and ceftaroline.

METHODS:

Antimicrobial testing of the clinical strain was performed using Etest and microdilution broth methods. Time-kill and chequerboard methodologies were used to test the activity of antibiotic combinations.

RESULTS:

By Etest, the MIC of vancomycin was 2 mg/L, the MIC of daptomycin was 2 mg/L, the MIC of fosfomycin was 1024 mg/L and the MIC of ceftaroline was 1.5 mg/L. At the standard inoculum (105 cfu/mL), the three combinations of daptomycin plus ceftaroline, cloxacillin or fosfomycin were synergistic and bactericidal. However, when these combinations were tested using a higher inoculum (108 cfu/mL), all combinations were synergistic, but only daptomycin plus ceftaroline had bactericidal activity.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results confirmed a synergistic effect between daptomycin plus ceftaroline and increased bactericidal activity against MRSA, suggesting that this combination may be effective for the treatment of invasive MRSA infection. Our experience highlights the potential clinical use of synergy testing to guide difficult treatment decisions in patients with MDR MRSA infection.

PMID:
31298264
DOI:
10.1093/jac/dkz253

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