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J Pediatr Surg. 2019 Nov;54(11):2443-2447. doi: 10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2019.06.016. Epub 2019 Jun 27.

Evaluation of Lung Injury in Infants with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia.

Author information

1
The Perinatal Institute Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.
2
Cincinnati Fetal Center, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center; Divisions of Pediatric General, Thoracic and Fetal Surgery, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center; Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH.
3
The Perinatal Institute Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center; Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH.
4
The Perinatal Institute Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center; Cincinnati Fetal Center, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center; Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH. Electronic address: paul.kingma@cchmc.org.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/PURPOSE:

The presence of lung injury and the factors that contribute to it in infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) have not been objectively measured during their clinical course. In adults with acute respiratory distress syndrome, higher serum levels of surfactant protein D (SP-D) are linked to lung injury and worse outcomes. We hypothesized that serum SP-D levels would be elevated in CDH infants and that the levels would correlate to the amount of lung injury present.

METHODS:

In this retrospective cohort study, serum SP-D levels were analyzed in 37 CDH infants and 5 control infants using a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit.

RESULTS:

Infants with more severe CDH had a statistically significant increase (p < 0.001) in serum SP-D over their first month of life. SP-D levels in CDH infants were similar to control infants while on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) but were 2.5-fold higher (p = 0.03) than controls following ECMO termination. SP-D levels increased 1.6-fold following surgical repair of the diaphragm and were significantly higher in the second week following surgery when compared to pre-operative levels (p < 0.03).

CONCLUSIONS:

These results demonstrate that CDH infants experience lung injury during the first week of life, around the time of surgery, and at the time of ECMO termination. Level II prognosis study.

KEYWORDS:

Congenital diaphragmatic hernia; Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation; Lung injury; Surfactant protein D

PMID:
31296329
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2019.06.016
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