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Curr Pain Headache Rep. 2019 Jul 10;23(8):57. doi: 10.1007/s11916-019-0794-9.

An Update on Cognitive Therapy for the Management of Chronic Pain: a Comprehensive Review.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesia, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Critical Care, and Pain Medicine, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Ave, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. iurits@bidmc.harvard.edu.
2
Phoenix Regional Campus, Creighton University School of Medicine, Phoenix, AZ, USA.
3
Department of Anesthesia, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Critical Care, and Pain Medicine, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Ave, Boston, MA, 02215, USA.
4
A.T. Still University Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine, Kirksville, MO, USA.
5
Department of Anesthesiology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA, USA.
6
Valley Anesthesiology and Pain Consultants, Phoenix, AZ, USA.
7
Department of Anesthesiology, University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix, Phoenix, AZ, USA.
8
Department of Anesthesiology, Creighton University School of Medicine, Omaha, NE, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

Psychological approaches to the management of chronic pain have proven to be very effective in allowing patients to better manage their symptoms and with overall functioning.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Cognitive functional therapy (CFT) is centered on a three-step process, beginning with cognitive training, then progressing to functional movement training and exposure with control, and ending with physical activity and lifestyle changes. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) as a technique focuses on identifying and changing maladaptive behaviors, thought patterns, and situations that contribute to psychiatric dysfunction, which may lead to further progression of pain. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive update of recent advances in the use of both CFT and CBT for the management of chronic pain conditions.

KEYWORDS:

Chronic pain; Cognitive behavioral therapy; Cognitive functional therapy; Low back pain; Psychotherapy

PMID:
31292747
DOI:
10.1007/s11916-019-0794-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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