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Sci Rep. 2019 Jul 10;9(1):9995. doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-46484-2.

Human DC-SIGN and CD23 do not interact with human IgG.

Author information

1
Department Experimental Immunohematology, Sanquin Research and Landsteiner Laboratory, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
2
Department Immunopathology, Sanquin Research and Landsteiner Laboratory, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
3
Center for Proteomics and Metabolomics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.
4
Department Experimental Immunohematology, Sanquin Research and Landsteiner Laboratory, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. G.Vidarsson@sanquin.nl.

Abstract

The precise mechanisms underlying anti-inflammatory effects of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapies remain elusive. The sialylated IgG fraction within IVIg has been shown to be therapeutically more active in mouse models. Functionally, it has been suggested that IgG undergoes conformational changes upon Fc-sialylation which sterically impede binding to conventional FcγRs, but simultaneously allow binding to human DC-SIGN (SIGN-R1 in mice) and also CD23. These latter C-type lectins have been proposed responsible for the immunomodulatory effects in mouse models. However, there is conflicting evidence supporting direct interactions between sialylated human IgG and CD23/DC-SIGN. While cells expressing human CD23 and DC-SIGN in their native configuration bound their natural ligands IgE and ICAM-3, respectively, no IgG binding was observed, regardless of Fc-glycan sialylation in any context (with or without bisection and/or fucosylation) or presence of sialylated Fab-glycans. This was tested by both by FACS and a novel cellular Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (cSPRi) approach allowing for monitoring low-affinity but high-avidity interactions. In summary, we find no evidence for human CD23 or DC-SIGN being bona fide receptors to human IgG, regardless of IgG Fc- or Fab-glycosylation status. However, these results do not exclude the possibility that either IgG glycosylation or C-type lectins affect IVIg therapies.

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