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J Cancer. 2019 Jun 2;10(14):3259-3266. doi: 10.7150/jca.30079. eCollection 2019.

Urovysion FISH Could Be Effective and Useful Method to Confirm the Identity of Cultured Circulating Tumor Cells from Bladder Cancer Patients.

Author information

1
Department of Hospital Pathology, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Urology, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
3
The Cancer Research Institute, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

Objective: To explore whether cultured CTC from bladder-cancer patients originate from bladder cancer and share chromosomal abnormalities, by means of a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) test. Methods: A total of 15 ml of blood was collected from the patients with bladder cancer before treatment began. Isolated CTCs were divided into 5 ml for CTC enumeration and 10 ml for CTC culture. CTCs were counted by immunofluorescent staining with vimentin, cytokeratin, CD45, and DAPI antibody. CTCs were cultured using isolated CTCs in 96-well plates of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Growth Medium for 16~18 days. The resulting cultured CTCs from 20 men with bladder cancer were analyzed by Urovysion FISH. Results: Common gains were on chromosome 3, 7, and 17 in 20 (74.1%), 14 (51.9%), and 20 (74.1%) of 27 patients, respectively. Polysomy was detected on chromosomes 3 and 7 in 9 patients (33.3%). Polysomy involving two chromosomes was observed in 16 (59.3%, chromosome 3 and 17) and 9 patients (33.3%, chromosome 7 and 17) in the same cell. Among the patients with isolated gain, 17 (63.0%) met the positive criteria for Urovysion FISH. Homozygous deletion of 9p21, 5 (18.5%) involved more than 12 cells. Among the different patient cohorts, positive results based on the Urovysion criteria were obtained in cultured CTCs derived from 19 (70.4%) patients. Conclusion: Application of FISH Urovysion to cultured CTCs from bladder cancer could be an effective first step to confirm their origin and sharing of chromosomal abnormalities.

KEYWORDS:

Circulating tumor cells; FISH Technique; bladder cancer; chromosomal abnormality

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