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J Cancer. 2019 Jun 2;10(14):3253-3258. doi: 10.7150/jca.30057. eCollection 2019.

Analysis of the perceptions and attitudes to participate in radical and palliative clinical trials among Chinese lymphoma and head/neck cancer patients.

Kong QH1,2, Yang LP1,2, Lai YR2,3, Qin HY2,4, He LZ2,5, Liu YS1,2, Li YE2,5, Chen XJ2,5, Qiu MZ1,2, Wang ZX1,2, Wang Y1,2.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou 510060, China.
2
Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center; State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China; Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060, China.
3
Department of Gynecological Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou 510060, China.
4
Department of Nursing, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou 510060, China.
5
Department of Clinical Research, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou 510060, China.

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this prospective study was to investigate the perceptions and attitudes to participate in radical and palliative clinical trials among Chinese lymphoma and head/neck cancer patients. Patients and Methods: A self-developed questionnaire was administered to hospitalized patients in the Department of Medical Oncology in Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center between 20 September 2014 and 20 September 2015. This study included lymphoma patients who were enrolled into a radical treatment clinical trial, and head/neck cancer patients participating in a palliative clinical trial. Results: There were 136 lymphoma patients and 87 head/neck cancer patients who completed and returned the questionnaire. The questionnaire return rate was 100%. More than 90% of the patients in both groups showed trust and acceptance for medical care personnel, and more than 50% of the patients in both groups were in hope of trying new medication, receiving free medication, and receiving new treatment at an earlier rate. As compared with those in the radical trials, patients in the palliative clinical trials were more likely to hope to try new medication (P<0.001) and receive a new treatment at an earlier date (P=0.025), but less likely to hope to receive free medication (P=0.047). Conclusions: This study reveals several shared perceptions and needs of patients in both the radical (lymphoma) and palliative (head/neck cancer) settings and explores the differences in patients' attitudes between radical clinical trials and palliative clinical trials. These findings may provide a basis for improving recruitment of patients for different types of clinical trials and ensuring that patients have a better understanding of clinical trials.

KEYWORDS:

differences in perception; free medication; new treatment; palliative clinical trials; patient recruiting; radical clinical trials

Conflict of interest statement

Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interest exists.

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