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J Cancer. 2019 Jun 2;10(14):3179-3187. doi: 10.7150/jca.30278. eCollection 2019.

Intensive Care Unit Admission and Survival in Stage IV Cancer Patients with Septic Shock: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

Lee MR1,2,3, Lai CL1,2,3,4, Chan KA5,6.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital Hsin-Chu Branch, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan.
2
Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.
3
Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.
4
Center for Critical Care Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital Hsin-Chu Branch, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan.
5
Department of Medical Research, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
6
Graduate Institute of Oncology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.

Abstract

Background: The impact of intensive care unit (ICU) admission during life-threatening critical illness on survival of patients with advanced cancer remains unknown. Methods: We identified incident stage IV cancer patients from Taiwan Cancer Registry during 2009-2013 and ascertained the first episode of septic shock after cancer diagnosis. Patient was classified as ICU admission and no ICU admission during the index hospitalization. Primary outcome of interest was overall survival. Propensity score (PS) and proportional hazards regression were used to control potential confounders. Results: A total of 11,825 stage IV cancer patients with septic shock were identified. Among them, 6,089 (51.5%) patients were admitted to ICU during the index hospitalization and 3,626 (30.7%) patients survived the index hospitalization. A 1:1 propensity score (PS)-matched cohort of 7,186 patients were created for patients with/without ICU admission among the total study population. Both the PS-stratified analysis among the overall population (pooled hazard ratio [HR]: 0.78, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.74-0.81) and analysis among the PS-matched population (HR: 0.76, 95% CI: 0.72-0.79) showed association between ICU admission and better overall survival. ICU admission was also associated with a lower risk of in-hospital mortality in both PS-stratified analysis (pooled odds ratio [OR]: 0.69, 95% CI: 0.63-0.75) and PS-matched analysis (OR: 0.61, 95% CI: 0.55-0.68). In PS-stratified analysis for long-term survival after discharge among hospital survivors, ICU admission was associated with improved long-term survival after discharge (pooled HR: 0.73, 95% CI: 0.68-0.80). Also ICU admission was associated with better long-term survival after discharge (HR: 0.77, 95% CI: 0.70-0.85) in PS-matched analysis. Conclusions: Though ICU admission with aggressive treatment may be associated with improved survival, the majority (70%) of stage IV cancer patients with septic shock were unable to survive until hospital discharge.

KEYWORDS:

cancer; intensive care unit; septic shock; survival

Conflict of interest statement

Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interest exists.

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