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BMC Nephrol. 2019 Jul 9;20(1):252. doi: 10.1186/s12882-019-1450-7.

Effect of dialysate potassium and lactate on serum potassium and bicarbonate concentrations during daily hemodialysis at low dialysate flow rates.

Author information

1
Unaffiliated, San Clemente, California, USA. kenleypoldt@gmail.com.
2
NxStage Medical, Lawrence, MA, USA.
3
St. Elizabeth's Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA.
4
Department of Pharmaceutical Care and Health Systems, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
5
Medical School, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Observational studies of hemodialysis patients treated thrice weekly have shown that serum and dialysate potassium and bicarbonate concentrations are associated with patient outcomes. The effect of more frequent hemodialysis on serum potassium and bicarbonate concentrations has rarely been studied, especially for treatments at low dialysate flow rate.

METHODS:

These post-hoc analyses evaluated data from patients who transferred from in-center hemodialysis (HD) to daily HD at low dialysate flow rates during the FREEDOM Study. The primary outcomes were the change in predialysis serum potassium and bicarbonate concentrations after transfer from in-center HD (mean during the last 3 months) to daily HD (mean during the first 3 months).

RESULTS:

After transfer from in-center HD to daily HD (data from 345 patients, 51 ± 15 years of age, mean ± standard deviation), predialysis serum potassium decreased (P < 0.001) by approximately 0.4 mEq/L when dialysate potassium concentration during daily HD was 1 mEq/L; no change occurred when dialysate potassium concentration during daily HD was 2 mEq/L. After transfer from in-center HD to daily HD (data from 284 patients, 51 ± 15 years of age), predialysis serum bicarbonate concentration decreased (P = 0.0022) by 1.0 ± 3.3 mEq/L when dialysate lactate concentration was 40 mEq/L but increased (P < 0.001) by 2.5 ± 3.5 mEq/L when dialysate lactate concentration was 45 mEq/L. These relationships were dependent on serum potassium and bicarbonate concentrations during in-center HD.

CONCLUSIONS:

Control of serum potassium and bicarbonate concentrations during daily HD at low dialysate flow rates is readily achievable; the choice of dialysate potassium and lactate concentration can be informed when transfer is from in-center HD to daily HD.

KEYWORDS:

Bicarbonate; Daily dialysis; Dialysate; Lactate; Low dialysate flow rate; Potassium

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