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Reprod Toxicol. 2019 Jul 6;89:124-129. doi: 10.1016/j.reprotox.2019.07.003. [Epub ahead of print]

Update of the DevTox data database for harmonized risk assessment and alternative methodologies in developmental toxicology: Report of the 9th Berlin Workshop on Developmental Toxicity.

Author information

1
German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Germany.
2
Hannover, Germany.
3
Fraunhofer Institute for Toxicology and Experimental Medicine, Hannover, Germany.
4
German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Germany. Electronic address: devtox@bfr.bund.de.
5
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), France.
6
NHC Key Lab. of Reproduction Regulation (Shanghai Institute of Planned Parenthood Research), Fudan University, China.
7
Astellas Pharma Inc., Tokyo, Japan.
8
Hatano Research Institute, FDSC, Kanagawa, Japan.
9
Istituto Superiore di Sanità (ISS), Rome, Italy.
10
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C., USA.
11
Oswaldo Cruz Foundation Brazil, Brazil.
12
German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Germany; Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany.
13
BASF SE, Ludwigshafen, Germany.
14
National Toxicology Program, Durham, USA.
15
Leibniz Research Institute for Environmental Medicine, Düsseldorf, Germany.
16
Ruth Clark Associates Ltd., United Kingdom.
17
Shiga University of Medical Sciences, Japan.
18
Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany.

Abstract

Representatives of applied science (e.g. governmental organizations, academia, and industry) met to discuss the progress towards a harmonized human health risk assessment in developmental toxicology of plant protection products, biocidal products, and other environmental chemicals at the 9th Berlin Workshop on Developmental Toxicity held in September 2018. Within the focus of the scientific discussion were the future of in-vitro methods for developmental and reproductive toxicology, the potential relevance of alternative species in testing of developmental effects, and risk and hazard assessment of developmental and endocrine effects. Furthermore, the need for a harmonized terminology for classification of anomalies in laboratory animals in developmental toxicity studies aiming for human health risk assessment was determined. Here, the DevTox database was identified as an extremely valuable tool. Overall, the participants agreed that still one of the biggest challenges for testing developmental toxicity in the 21st century is the development of animal-free test strategies and alternatives to animal testing that could provide human-relevant information in a rapid, efficient, and mechanistically informative manner.

KEYWORDS:

Alternative methods; Categorised anomalies; DevTox update; Developmental toxicology; Harmonized terminology; Risk assessment

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