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Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2019 Sep;26(25):26332-26338. doi: 10.1007/s11356-019-05731-9. Epub 2019 Jul 9.

Exposure to bisphenol A and diabetes risk in Mexican women.

Author information

1
Center for Research in Population Health, National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico.
2
Department of Biology, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA, USA.
3
Department of Toxicology, CINVESTAV, Mexico City, Mexico.
4
Department of Analytical Chemistry, National Autonomous University of Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico.
5
Center for Research in Population Health, National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico. lizbeth@insp.mx.
6
Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Universidad 655, col. Santa María Ahuacatitlán, C.P 62100, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico. lizbeth@insp.mx.

Abstract

Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine-disrupting chemical widely used in the production of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins, which has been previously linked to diabetes among non-Hispanic populations. As part of a case control study for breast cancer, only controls with BPA information were included in this report. The final sample size comprises 70 self-reported diabetics and 334 non-diabetics. Urinary free bisphenol A (BPA-F) (μg/L) was determined by solid-phase extraction and HPLC/FLD analysis. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association between BPA-F and self-reported diabetes. After adjusting by age, urinary BPA-F (4.06-224.53 μg/g creatinine) was associated with diabetes exposure (OR = 1.85; 95% CI 1.04, 3.28) compared with women in the reference category (0.67-4.05 μg/g creatinine). BPA may be an environmental cofactor of diabetes. More studies are needed to confirm this result, especially in Hispanic populations.

KEYWORDS:

BPA; Bisphenol a; Diabetes; Endocrine-disrupting chemical; Mexico; Women

PMID:
31286379
DOI:
10.1007/s11356-019-05731-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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