Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nat Hum Behav. 2019 Jul 8. doi: 10.1038/s41562-019-0648-9. [Epub ahead of print]

Cortical encoding of speech enhances task-relevant acoustic information.

Author information

1
Brain and Language Lab, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Psychology and Education Sciences, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. Sanne.Rutten@unige.ch.
2
Brain and Language Lab, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Psychology and Education Sciences, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
3
Neurolinguistics, Department of Psychology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
4
Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, Faculty of Psychology and Neuroscience, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands.
5
Maastricht Brain Imaging Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands.
6
Maastricht Centre for Systems Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands.

Abstract

Speech is the most important signal in our auditory environment, and the processing of speech is highly dependent on context. However, it is unknown how contextual demands influence the neural encoding of speech. Here, we examine the context dependence of auditory cortical mechanisms for speech encoding at the level of the representation of fundamental acoustic features (spectrotemporal modulations) using model-based functional magnetic resonance imaging. We found that the performance of different tasks on identical speech sounds leads to neural enhancement of the acoustic features in the stimuli that are critically relevant to task performance. These task effects were observed at the earliest stages of auditory cortical processing, in line with interactive accounts of speech processing. Our work provides important insights into the mechanisms that underlie the processing of contextually relevant acoustic information within our rich and dynamic auditory environment.

PMID:
31285622
DOI:
10.1038/s41562-019-0648-9

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center