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J Neurol Sci. 2019 Aug 15;403:139-145. doi: 10.1016/j.jns.2019.06.028. Epub 2019 Jun 28.

Distinct profiles of cognitive impairment associated with different silent cerebrovascular lesions in hypertensive elderly Chinese.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, China; Department of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
2
Department of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
3
Centre of Buddhist Studies, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
4
Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
5
Sai Ying Pun Jockey Club General Out-patient Clinic, Hong Kong.
6
Department of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; Research Centre of Heart, Brain, Hormone & Healthy Aging, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong. Electronic address: rtcheung@hkucc.hku.hk.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:

Silent cerebrovascular lesions (SCLs) and their underlying pathology are now recognized as important causes of cognitive impairment in the elderly. However, the distinct profile of cognitive deficits associated with each type of SCLs remains unclear.

METHODS:

Of 497 otherwise healthy hypertensive elderly Chinese, 398 participants (mean age 72.0, ranging from 65 to 99, SD = 5.1) successfully completed a battery of structured neuropsychological tests and a multi-sequence 3 T MRI scanning. SCLs were rated independently. Correlations between each MRI marker and cognitive function were assessed using a series of linear regression models.

RESULTS:

Strictly lobar cerebral microbleeds were linked to impaired language function (B = -0.231, p < 0.05). Silent lacunes were associated with poor executive function, but the association disappeared after additional adjustment for white matter hyperintensities. White matter hyperintensities (especially periventricular hyperintensities) were associated with poor executive function (B = -0.126, p < 0.05) and slower information processing speed (B = -0.149, p < 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

Different SCLs were associated with different patterns of cognitive deficits, indicating that different SCLs may have distinct impacts on cognitive performance.

KEYWORDS:

Cerebral microbleeds; Neuropsychological assessment; Silent lacunes; Vascular cognitive impairment; White matter hyperintensities

PMID:
31284183
DOI:
10.1016/j.jns.2019.06.028

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