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Neuroimage. 2019 Jul 4;200:405-413. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.07.006. [Epub ahead of print]

Differential coupling between subcortical calcium and BOLD signals during evoked and resting state through simultaneous calcium fiber photometry and fMRI.

Author information

1
School of Biomedical Engineering, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Image Processing, Key Laboratory of Mental Health of the Ministry of Education, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China; Institute of Neuroscience, CAS Center for Excellence in Brain Sciences and Intelligence Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China.
2
Institute of Neuroscience, CAS Center for Excellence in Brain Sciences and Intelligence Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China.
3
School of Biomedical Engineering, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Image Processing, Key Laboratory of Mental Health of the Ministry of Education, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China. Electronic address: foree@smu.edu.cn.
4
Institute of Neuroscience, CAS Center for Excellence in Brain Sciences and Intelligence Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China; Key Laboratory of Primate Neurobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China. Electronic address: zliang@ion.ac.cn.

Abstract

Task based and resting state fMRI has been widely utilized to study brain functions. As the foundation of fMRI, the underlying neural basis of the BOLD signal has been extensively studied, but the detailed mechanism remains elusive, particularly during the resting state. To examine the neurovascular coupling, it is important to simultaneously record neural and vascular signals. Here we developed a novel setup of camera based, scalable simultaneous calcium fiber photometry and fMRI in rats. Using this setup, we recorded calcium signals of superior colliculus (SC) and lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and fMRI simultaneously during visual stimulation and the resting state. Our results revealed robust, region-specific coupling between calcium and BOLD signals in the task state and weaker, whole brain correlation in the resting state. Interestingly, the spatial specificity of such correlation in the resting state was improved upon regression of white matter, ventricle signals and global signals in fMRI data. Overall, our results suggest differential coupling of calcium and BOLD signals for subcortical regions between evoked and resting states, and the coupling relationship in the resting state was related with resting state BOLD preprocessing strategies.

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