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Neuroimage. 2019 Jul 4;200:659-673. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.07.008. [Epub ahead of print]

Cognitive reward control recruits medial and lateral frontal cortices, which are also involved in cognitive emotion regulation: A coordinate-based meta-analysis of fMRI studies.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, 81675, Germany; Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, 81675, Germany; TUM-NIC Neuroimaging Center, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, 81675, Germany. Electronic address: felix.brandl@tum.de.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, 81675, Germany; Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, 81675, Germany.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, 81675, Germany; Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, 81675, Germany; TUM-NIC Neuroimaging Center, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, 81675, Germany.

Abstract

Cognitive reward control (CRC) refers to the cognitive control of one's craving for hedonic stimuli, like food, sex, or drugs. Numerous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have investigated neural sources of CRC. However, a consistent pattern of brain activation across stimulus types has not been identified so far. We addressed this question using coordinate-based meta-analysis of task-fMRI studies during CRC. To further characterize such a potential common CRC activation pattern, we extended our approach to three additional questions: (i) Do CRC meta-analytic results overlap with those during the control of emotional states, such as in cognitive regulation of aversive emotions (cognitive emotion regulation, CER)? (ii) How does the control of motivational/emotional states link to the control of action states with less motivational/emotional valence such as in response inhibition paradigms, i.e., do meta-anyltic result maps overlap? (iii) Does the control of motivational/emotional states constitute a consistent pattern of organized (i.e., coherent) ongoing or intrinsic brain activity? This question was tested by a seed-based intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) analysis in an independent data set of resting-state fMRI. We found consistent CRC activation mainly in supplementary motor, dorsolateral prefrontal, and ventrolateral prefrontal cortices across studies. This activation pattern overlapped largely with CER-related activation, except for left-sided lateral temporal and parietal cortex activation, which was more pronounced during CER. It overlapped partly with activation during response inhibition in (pre-)supplementary motor, insular, and parietal cortices, but differed from it in dorsolateral and ventrolateral prefrontal cortices. Furthermore, it remarkably defined an iFC network covering activation patterns of both CRC and CER. Results demonstrate a consistent activation pattern of CRC across stimulus types, which overlaps largely with those of CER but only partly with those of response inhibition and constitutes an intrinsic co-activity network. These data suggest a common mechanism for the cognitive control of both motivational and emotional stimuli.

KEYWORDS:

Cognitive emotion regulation; Cognitive reward control; Functional magnetic resonance imaging; meta-Analysis

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