Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Lancet Neurol. 2019 Sep;18(9):880-890. doi: 10.1016/S1474-4422(19)30152-8. Epub 2019 Jul 3.

Recent developments in drug-induced movement disorders: a mixed picture.

Author information

1
Jean and Paul Amos Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Program, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA. Electronic address: sfactor@emory.edu.
2
Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
3
Corporal Michael J Crescenz VA Medical Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
4
Butler Hospital, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, USA.
5
Edmond J Safra Program in Parkinson's Research, University of Toronto, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada.
6
Department of Neuroscience, Biomedicine, and Movement, University of Verona, Verona, Italy.
7
Department of Neurological Sciences, Rush Medical College, Chicago, IL, USA.

Abstract

A large and ever-growing number of medications can induce various movement disorders. Drug-induced movement disorders are disabling but are often under-recognised and inappropriately managed. In particular, second generation antipsychotics, like first generation agents, are associated with potentially debilitating side-effects, most notably tardive syndromes and parkinsonism, as well as potentially fatal acute syndromes. Appropriate, evidence-based management is essential as these drugs are being prescribed to a growing population vulnerable to these side-effects, including children and elderly people. Prevention of the development of drug-induced movement disorders is an important consideration when prescribing medications that can induce movement disorders. Recent developments in diagnosis, such as the use of dopamine transporter imaging for drug-induced parkinsonism, and treatment, with the approval of valbenazine and deutetrabenazine, the first drugs indicated for tardive syndromes, have improved outcomes for many patients with drug-induced movement disorders. Future research should focus on development of safer antipsychotics and specific therapies for the different tardive syndromes and the treatment of drug-induced parkinsonism.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center