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Thromb Haemost. 1987 Dec 18;58(4):1033-6.

Intranasal and intravenous administration of desmopressin: effect on F VIII/vWF, pharmacokinetics and reproducibility.

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1
Department of Coagulation Disorders, University of Lund, Allmänna Sjukhuset, Malmö, Sweden.

Abstract

A comparison was made of intranasal administration of 300 micrograms desmopressin (DDAVP) by spray, with intravenous administration of 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 microgram DDAVP/kg in 10 healthy volunteers. The effect of DDAVP was measured on F VIII/vWF complex and on plasminogen activator release. In addition, plasma levels of DDAVP were determined using a specific and sensitive radioimmunoassay. Moreover, the reproducibility of the spray effect in 10 healthy volunteers was tested after administration of 300 micrograms DDAVP intranasally by spray on 5 different occasions. Plasma levels of DDAVP showed a clear dose-response with the maximum levels at 0.4 microgram/kg i.v. The effect of the spray approximated the 0.2 microgram/kg response. However, the maximum response in both F VIII/vWF complex and plasminogen activator release was obtained after 0.3 microgram/kg i.v. The response to 0.4 microgram/kg i.v. was not significantly different from the response to 0.3 microgram/kg indicating that maximum stimulation was reached with 0.3 micrograms/kg. There was no correlation between plasma levels of F VIII/vWF and DDAVP indicating that the biological response to DDAVP is subjected to saturation kinetics. The reproducibility of the effect of the spray dose on VIII:C was 21% (c.v.) and 27% for the intra-individual and inter-individual variation, respectively, and compared favorably with intravenous administration. Intranasal DDAVP (300 micrograms) is as effective as 0.2 micrograms/kg intravenously and provides an accurate, reproducible and convenient alternative to parenteral administration.

PMID:
3127915
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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