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Drug Discov Today. 2019 Jul 3. pii: S1359-6446(19)30138-2. doi: 10.1016/j.drudis.2019.06.020. [Epub ahead of print]

Target 2035: probing the human proteome.

Author information

1
Discovery Research Coordination, Boehringer Ingelheim, 55216 Ingelheim am Rhein, Germany. Electronic address: adrian.carter@boehringer-ingelheim.com.
2
Discovery Research Coordination, Boehringer Ingelheim, 55216 Ingelheim am Rhein, Germany.
3
Computational Biology, Boehringer Ingelheim, 88400 Biberach an der Riß, Germany.
4
Lead Discovery, Bayer AG, 13342 Berlin, Germany.
5
Structural Genomics Consortium, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1L7, Canada; Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1L7, Canada.
6
Structural Genomics Consortium, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1L7, Canada.

Abstract

Biomedical scientists tend to focus on only a small fraction of the proteins encoded by the human genome despite overwhelming genetic evidence that many understudied proteins are important for human disease. One of the best ways to interrogate the function of a protein and to determine its relevance as a drug target is by using a pharmacological modulator, such as a chemical probe or an antibody. If these tools were available for most human proteins, it should be possible to translate the tremendous advances in genomics into a greater understanding of human health and disease, and catalyze the creation of innovative new medicines. Target 2035 is a global federation for developing and applying new technologies with the goal of creating chemogenomic libraries, chemical probes, and/or functional antibodies for the entire proteome.

PMID:
31278990
DOI:
10.1016/j.drudis.2019.06.020
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