Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Appetite. 2019 Nov 1;142:104347. doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2019.104347. Epub 2019 Jul 3.

Using repeated exposure through hands-on cooking to increase children's preferences for fruits and vegetables.

Author information

1
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
2
School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA; Center for Ingestive Behavior Research, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA.
3
Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA.
4
Center for Ingestive Behavior Research, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA; Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA. Electronic address: safrasca@buffalo.edu.

Abstract

Few children in the United States meet national fruit and vegetable intake recommendations, highlighting a need for interventions. Children's food preferences act as a barrier to fruit and vegetable consumption, but prior research has demonstrated that repeated taste exposures can increase children's acceptance of these foods. Prior research in this area has typically utilized controlled procedures in which children sample small tastes of target foods over repeated occasions. The primary aim of the present pilot study was to test whether children's preferences for target fruits and vegetables increased following repeated taste exposures to them through hands-on cooking in a community setting. Seventeen 6-to-8-year-old children participated in biweekly study sessions during six weeks of a summer camp serving lower-income families. Liking of (yummy, just OK, yucky) and rank-ordered preferences for nine fruits and vegetables were measured before and after exposure sessions (pre-test and post-test). Based on pre-test assessments, four relatively less liked foods (two fruits, two vegetables) were chosen to become target foods. Children were then exposed to target foods during nine hands-on cooking sessions; liking of target foods was also measured at a midpoint assessment. At each exposure session, children assisted with preparation of a different snack using a recipe involving target foods and then ate the prepared snack together. Preferences for target foods increased from pre-test (Median = 5.8) to post-test (Median = 5.5; p < 0.05). On average, the majority of children rated the prepared snacks favorably. Results from this pilot study demonstrate the potential of applying repeated exposure techniques via hands-on cooking in a community setting.

KEYWORDS:

Children; Cooking; Food preferences; Low-income; Repeated exposure; Summer camp

PMID:
31278956
PMCID:
PMC6717537
[Available on 2020-11-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.appet.2019.104347

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center