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Nat Commun. 2019 Jul 5;10(1):2976. doi: 10.1038/s41467-019-10881-y.

Myelinating Schwann cells ensheath multiple axons in the absence of E3 ligase component Fbxw7.

Author information

1
Thaden School, 410 SE Staggerwing Lane, Bentonville, AR, 72712, USA.
2
Department of Developmental Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, 660S. Euclid Ave., St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA.
3
Vollum Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Rd., Portland, OR, 97239, USA.
4
Department of Neurology, Weill Institute for Neuroscience, University of California San Francisco, 675 Nelson Rising Lane, San Francisco, CA, 94158, USA.
5
Institute of Neuroscience, University of Oregon, 1440 Franklin Blvd., Eugene, OR, 97403, USA.
6
Department of Developmental Biology, Stanford University, 279W. Campus Dr., Stanford, CA, 94305, USA.
7
Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University Pain Center, 660S. Euclid Ave., St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA.
8
Centre for Brain Discovery Sciences, MS Society Centre for Translational Research, Euan MacDonald Centre for Motor Neurone Disease Research, University of Edinburgh, 49 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4SB, UK.
9
Department of Developmental Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, 660S. Euclid Ave., St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA. monk@ohsu.edu.
10
Vollum Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Rd., Portland, OR, 97239, USA. monk@ohsu.edu.

Abstract

In the central nervous system (CNS), oligodendrocytes myelinate multiple axons; in the peripheral nervous system (PNS), Schwann cells (SCs) myelinate a single axon. Why are the myelinating potentials of these glia so fundamentally different? Here, we find that loss of Fbxw7, an E3 ubiquitin ligase component, enhances the myelinating potential of SCs. Fbxw7 mutant SCs make thicker myelin sheaths and sometimes appear to myelinate multiple axons in a fashion reminiscent of oligodendrocytes. Several Fbxw7 mutant phenotypes are due to dysregulation of mTOR; however, the remarkable ability of mutant SCs to ensheathe multiple axons is independent of mTOR signaling. This indicates distinct roles for Fbxw7 in SC biology including modes of axon interactions previously thought to fundamentally distinguish myelinating SCs from oligodendrocytes. Our data reveal unexpected plasticity in the myelinating potential of SCs, which may have important implications for our understanding of both PNS and CNS myelination and myelin repair.

PMID:
31278268
PMCID:
PMC6611888
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-019-10881-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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