Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 Jul 3;16(13). pii: E2356. doi: 10.3390/ijerph16132356.

Smoking-Related DNA Methylation is Associated with DNA Methylation Phenotypic Age Acceleration: The Veterans Affairs Normative Aging Study.

Author information

1
School of Public Health, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
2
Laboratory of Environmental Epigenetics, Department of Environmental Health Sciences Epidemiology, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY 10032, USA.
3
Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA.
4
Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
5
Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
6
Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611, USA.
7
Veterans Affairs Normative Aging Study, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118, USA.
8
Laboratory of Environmental Epigenetics, Department of Environmental Health Sciences Epidemiology, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY 10032, USA. ab4303@cumc.columbia.edu.

Abstract

DNA methylation may play a critical role in aging and age-related diseases. DNA methylation phenotypic age (DNAmPhenoAge) is a new aging biomarker and predictor of chronic disease risk. While smoking is a strong risk factor for chronic diseases and influences methylation, its influence on DNAmPhenoAge is unknown. We investigated associations of self-reported and epigenetic smoking indicators with DNAmPhenoAge acceleration in a longitudinal aging study in eastern Massachusetts. DNA methylation was measured in whole blood samples from multiple visits for 692 male participants in the Veterans Affairs Normative Aging Study during 1999-2013. Acceleration was defined using residuals from linear regression of the DNAmPhenoAge on the chronological age. Cumulative smoking (pack-years) was significantly associated with DNAmPhenoAge acceleration, whereas self-reported smoking status was not. We observed significant validated associations between smoking-related loci and DNAmPhenoAge acceleration for 52 CpG sites, where 18 were hypomethylated and 34 were hypermethylated, mapped to 16 genes. The AHRR gene had the most loci (N = 8) among the 16 genes. We generated a smoking aging index based on these 52 loci, which showed positive significant associations with DNAmPhenoAge acceleration. These epigenetic biomarkers may help to predict age-related risks driven by smoking.

KEYWORDS:

DNA methylation phenotypic age; aging acceleration; aging biomarker; smoking-related DNA methylation

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center