Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Adolesc. 2019 Jul;74:229-239. doi: 10.1016/j.adolescence.2019.06.014. Epub 2019 Jul 1.

Body image and weight management among Hispanic American adolescents: Differences by sport type.

Author information

1
Department of Health Promotions and Behaviorism, College of Public Health, 100 Foster Rd 245A Wright Hall, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 30602, USA. Electronic address: anita.reina@uga.edu.
2
Department of Physical Education, College of Education, Blatt PE Center, 1300 Wheat St., University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, 29201, USA. Electronic address: eavadocz@mailbox.sc.edu.
3
Department of Health Promotions and Behaviorism, College of Public Health, 100 Foster Rd 251C Wright Hall, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 30602, USA. Electronic address: marcus.dumas@uga.edu.
4
Department of Health Promotions and Behaviorism, College of Public Health, 100 Foster Rd 251E Wright Hall, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 30602, USA. Electronic address: jlgay@uga.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Adolescents' body image concerns vary by sex, ages, and participation in different types of sports. Little is known about variability of body image and weight management behaviors by sport type in Hispanic American adolescents. This study examined whether body image distortion and dissatisfaction are associated with weight management behaviors by sex and sport type in Hispanic adolescents.

METHODS:

A sample of 728 Hispanic participants from the United States (61.6% female, Mage = 12.36 ± 2.35) completed the Stunkard Figural Stimuli, reported weight management behaviors and sport participation. Sports were classified as non-aesthetic (such as soccer), aesthetic (such as cheerleading), or non-sport participation. Separate multiple linear regression and multinomial logistic regression models were conducted to test adjusted associations between body image dissatisfaction and distortion, and sport type with weight management behaviors.

RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS:

Participants in non-aesthetic sports (51.2% male) were more dissatisfied with their body image (want to be bigger; B = -0.17; p = .01) and were 1.5 times more likely to use exercise to lose weight than non-sport participants. Greater body image dissatisfaction increased the likelihood of weight management behaviors. As year in school increased, participants perceived themselves as smaller than their actual BMI and wanted to be smaller. Hispanic females exhibited similar trends to other ethnicities. However, Hispanic males may have interpreted a desire to be "smaller" as a more lean, muscular physique. Subsequent studies should focus on reasons for weight management, and whether those behaviors are healthy.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescence; Body image; Development; Hispanic; Sport participation; Weight management

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center