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J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2019 Oct;144(4):1122-1125.e6. doi: 10.1016/j.jaci.2019.06.017. Epub 2019 Jul 2.

Severe autoinflammation in 4 patients with C-terminal variants in cell division control protein 42 homolog (CDC42) successfully treated with IL-1β inhibition.

Author information

1
Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif. Electronic address: yaelg@stanford.edu.
2
Translational Autoinflammatory Diseases Section, Laboratory of Clinical Immunology and Microbiology, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Md.
3
Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, University of Toronto and the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
4
Division of Human Gene Therapy, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif.
5
Bioinformatics and Computational Biosciences Branch (BCBB) OCICB Rocky Mountain Laboratories, NIAID, NIH, Hamilton, Mont.
6
Division of Rheumatology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.
7
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Mass.
8
Division of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Immune Deficiency, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.
9
Division of Stem Cell Transplantation and Regenerative Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif.
10
Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif.
11
Division of Rheumatology/RK Mellon Institute, Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, Pa.
12
Division of Stem Cell Transplantation and Regenerative Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif. Electronic address: kgw1@stanford.edu.
PMID:
31271789
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaci.2019.06.017

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